Destination Detox – How to Detox While On the Go

An Interview with Ashley Koff, RD and author of The Road Trip to Better Health.

August is the month for last minute weekend getaways or for summer’s much anticipated week-long vacation. Families squeeze in a quick trip before the first day of school for many kids throughout the U.S. It may be easy to think you can splurge on salt, sugar and processed foods while you’re on the go, but your body shouldn’t be sacrificed just because you’re away from home. Just like any other day, you need to optimize your body’s systems, including its detox system.

The TrueBroc® team sat down with its scientific advisory board member, Ashley Koff RD, to learn how to detox while on the go.

TB: Everyone is talking about detoxification – how is it different from cleansing or a quick detox product you see at the store?
AK:
Our bodies have a lot to handle these days – stress, environmental pollutants, toxins, hormones – thankfully, the body comes equipped with a detoxification system that, given the right resources, can typically handle this workload.

A cleanse doesn’t have an actual definition. For some it’s reducing sugar or skipping alcohol, for others it’s only organic green juices and alkaline water for days or week(s) at a time. The idea of cleansing can involve removing or reducing offenders and perhaps adding certain foods or nutrients to help clean the body. Short and long-term effects depend on whether the cleanse matches a person’s body and the body’s needs.

Quick detox products run the gamut from unsafe to unhelpful most of the time, with a few exceptions. Quality detox products include nutrients that support the body’s detoxification system. That said, anything that says “quick detox” misses the fact that we should be detoxing daily to give our body the resources the detoxification system needs to do its job.

TB: If my body is detoxing every day, how can I best support it?
AK:
Look for broccoli or broccoli sprouts to get a quality dose of glucoraphanin. That said, the amount you get of this long-lasting antioxidant that supports detoxification will vary based on the batch of broccoli and how you prepare it. So eat your broccoli but if you seek consistent detoxification support add a supplemental dose of glucoraphanin like TrueBroc.

Prioritize Better Digestion. No detoxification efforts can be fully effective if your digestive system isn’t working better, not perfect, more often. Assess your digestion, then do the Digestive Tune It Up (as needed).

TB: How can I help support my detox system if I’m traveling or on the go constantly?
AK:
There are three easy steps that I share with my patients and practice myself.

  • Get in enough water throughout the day. What’s the right amount for you? Take the Better Water Evaluation.
  • Optimize digestion (see the tips I share in the Digestive Tune Up).
  • Order broccoli and pack Brassica® Tea or Coffee, which provides a standardized dose of TrueBroc and is easy to enjoy wherever you go – just add hot water (which helps with tip #1).

TB: Should I detox differently if I’m traveling to different climates – e.g. cold, tropical, humid/rainy, etc.? 
AK: While the detoxification system doesn’t have different needs, the environment will impact your body’s resource needs.

Cold climate: Warm up with broccoli roasted in olive oil, a bowl of soup and a hot cup of tea.

Tropical climate: enjoy the local flavors, adding pineapple, lemon, grapefruit and other citrus, as well as enjoying coconut water, which can make your perfect tropical Arnold Palmer (replace the lemonade with coconut water in your iced Brassica Tea).

TB: What’s in your travel bag?
AK:
I bring along my own arsenal to help aid my detox system…including Natural Calm magnesium, Sulforaclear® (supplement with TrueBroc) or Brassica Tea, and my Beauty Counter cleansing balm.

Brassica Achieves Top Honors

Brassica Protection Products, the maker of TrueBroc® glucoraphanin, was honored with the prestigious American Botanical Council’s (ABC) Varro E. Tyler Commercial Investment in Phytomedicinal Research Award for 2016. Tony Talalay, Brassica’s co-founder and CEO, accepted the award at a ceremony at the Natural Products Expo West Convention in California.

Unlocking the Health Properties of Cruciferous Vegetables – Broccoli

Through partnership with the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Brassica has laid the basis for understanding the health-protective properties of broccoli. Paul Talalay, MD, Distinguished ServiBrassica Tony Talalay accepts ABC Award 2017ce Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences at Johns Hopkins, discovered the ability of sulforaphane, a compound produced by cruciferous vegetables, to induce the production of enzymes that help eliminate toxic metabolites from the body. After a number of additional studies evaluating the properties of broccoli extracts, Paul Talalay founded Brassica Protection Products with his colleague Jed Fahey, ScD and his son Tony Talalay. One year later, the Hopkins group published findings on sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables and its potential health benefits, paving the way for subsequent clinical studies.

“Being honored with the ABC’s prestigious Varro E. Tyler Commercial Investment in Phytomedicinal Research Award is a wonderful tribute to a lifetime of research by my father, Paul Talalay, who has dedicated himself to understanding the body’s own protective systems and elucidating the benefits of broccoli, glucoraphanin and sulforaphane in promoting human health,” said Tony Talalay, CEO and co-founder of Brassica Protection Products. “This award is a confirmation of Brassica’s mission to bring scientifically valid nutritional products to consumers. It is especially gratifying as it recognizes the company’s primary goal — to continually ensure quality commercialization efforts that honor the extraordinary quality of the science.”

ABC Tyler Award

The ABC Tyler Award was created to honor one of the most respected scientists in late-20th century herbal medicine and pharmacognosy (the study of medicines of natural origin). Professor Tyler was an early trustee of ABC, dean of the Purdue University College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences for 20 years, and vice president of academic affairs at Purdue. He was the senior author of six editions of the leading textbook in the field, as well as numerous other professional and popular books and articles in the academic literature. Tyler encouraged scientific and product integrity, and envisioned a rational phytomedicinal health care sector that valued the proper evaluation of products’ quality, safety and efficacy.

Recipe: Brassica Tea Poached Pear – National Hot Tea Month

There is no better way to celebrate National Hot Tea Month than with a new tea recipe, but this one is not for your traditional tea cup. Our friend and registered dietitian – Amy Fischer @thegreenfisch – is back with a new recipe that features Brassica® Tea with a poached pear.

Whether you make this as a sweet or savory dish, you will be adding the health benefits of broccoli. Yes, broccoli! Each Brassica Tea bag includes 15 milligrams of the phytonutrient glucoraphanin that is found at the highest levels in broccoli. Studied for decades, the glucoraphanin helps to optimize the body’s own detoxification system. This powerful nutrient tags toxins for elimination while aiding in the actual elimination process.

Brassica® Tea Poached Pear
Servings: 6

IngredientsIngredients
5 Brassica Tea bags

6 cups filtered water

¾ cup honey

1- 1 inch piece ginger

½ tsp. vanilla bean powder or 1 vanilla bean

3 Bosc pears

Mascarpone cheese, greek yogurt, coconut yogurt, ice cream, etc.

Granola

Parchment Paper

Directions

Bring 6 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add tea bags to boiling water, remove saucepan from heat and let tea bags steep for approximately 8-10 minutes. Squeeze excess liquid from teas bags in saucepan and discard.Peeling Pears

Add honey, ginger, vanilla bean powder to the tea, stirring until honey has melted. Bring tea to a simmer and cook for approximately 5 minutes.

Peel pears using a carrot peeler and leave stems intact. With a melon baller or small spoon scoop out seeds from bottom of each pear. Add pears to saucepan and simmer for approximately 15 minutes until pears are tender. Remove pears from liquid and let cool.

Boiling pearsContinue to simmer the liquid in pan until it is reduced by about half and thickens. Discard ginger pieces and let tea cool. Cut pears in half and spoon the reduced liquid over the pear. Serve with a dollop of mascarpone cheese, greek or coconut yogurt or a scoop of ice cream and granola.

True Detox Happens 365 Days a Year – 3 Steps to Make it Last

3 Steps to Make Your Detox Plan Last All Year from Ashley Koff RD

You are reading the latest detox headlines…

  • You can’t detox your body. It’s a myth.
  • The debate over juice cleanses and toxin removal
  • Detoxify your liver in two weeks
  • Three day detox cleanse

… and you are confused! Rightfully so.

True detoxification doesn’t happen in two days or five days. It happens 365 days a year. Every single body is equipped with its own detox system and the key is to find ways to support it every day.

Ashley Koff, RD, award-winning nutrition expert and creator of the Better Nutrition Simplified Membership, shares three simple steps to help you optimize the body’s detoxification system every day.

No. 1: Tackle Toxins
Limit exposure to, and consumption of, environmental toxins. When you can, opt for organic fruits and vegetables, as well unhealthy-body-graphicwebas natural household cleaners. Alcohol, cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust are other culprits to a stalled detoxification system.

No. 2: Eat Broccoli
Of all the cruciferous vegetables, broccoli has the highest levels of the phytonutrient glucoraphanin (glu·co·raph’·an·in). Studied for decades, glucoraphanin helps to optimize the body’s own detoxification system by upregulating the phase II enzyme system – essentially, it helps to tag toxins for elimination while aiding in the actual elimination process. Add broccoli (and glucoraphanin) to your plate every day with the help of these recipes.

No. 3: Drink to Detox
It is no surprise that our body needs water to function and our detox system is no different. To help get the recommend amount (approx. a half gallon) of water each day, be sure to guzzle some H2O before bed and as soon as you wake up – even before your morning cup of coffee or tea.

You can also get glucoraphanin from TrueBroc® in some of these Ashley Koff Approved (AKA) products – SulforaClear™ and OncoPLEX™, among others.

Recipe: Broccoli Risotto – Easy Rich and Creamy Risotto

The latest installment of our monthly “Recipe Friday” features an easy risotto recipe that features our favorite cruciferous vegetable – broccoli!  Amy Fisher, RD (@thegreenfisch) created this recipe knowing that the majority of Americans overcook their broccoli.  In fact, a recent survey by TrueBroc® found that nearly 40 percent of Americans are cooking their broccoli for 10 minutes or more (yuck!), which can significantly denature the good stuff, including glucoraphanin!

In this recipe, you only need to lightly steam the broccoli (less than 5 minutes).

Did you know?
1 cup of raw broccoli, chopped, has only 31 calories and boasts more than 2 grams of protein and 15 milligrams of glucoraphanin.


Broccoli Risotto
Servings: 6

Ingredients

1 large head of broccoliBroccoli risotto recipe - ingredients

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 cups vegetable stock, 2 Tbsp. grass-fed butter

1 medium onion chopped

12 oz. arborio rice

1 cup dry white wine

pinch of saffron threads

1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan

¼ cup freshly grated pecorino Romano

Directions

Cut broccoli into florets and steam for approximately 4-5 minutes, until tender. Remove from heat, rinse in cold water, drain and set aside.

In a saucepan bring stock to a boil, cover and keep warm.

In a large saucepan, melt 2 tbsp. butter with 2 tbsp. olive oil. Add onion and cook over medium heat for a few minutes until onion is soft and translucent. Add rice and cook stirring to coat it with butter and olive oil. Add wine Broccoli risotto recipe - stovetop cooking photoand simmer until almost evaporated. Add enough stock to just cover the rice and cook until the stock has evaporated. Add saffron to the remaining stock and let it steep. Then, continue adding the remainder of the stock with the saffron slowly, about ¼ cup each time, until the rice reaches the desired tenderness. The risotto is done when the rice is just past al dente and the risotto has a creamy texture, about 25 minutes. Stir in the cheese and fold in the broccoli. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Recipe – Grilled Broccoli Salad with Radish

It’s Labor Day! As you prepare to spend time with family and friends, fire up the grill and put refreshing drinks on ice, don’t be afraid to prepare delicious and healthy food that will wow your guests and deliver a kick of detox to your body.

The broccoli and radishes in our new Grilled Broccoli Salad recipe (thank you Amy Fischer, RD – @thegreenfisch) work as a team to help prepare the body for true detoxification. Broccoli florets feature the powerful phytonutrient glucoraphanin and the enzyme myrosinase, which work together to convert glucoraphanin to the potent antioxidant sulforaphane. Radishes are also rich in myrosinse.

Glucoraphanin is converted into sulforaphane via the enzyme myrosinase. This happens when we chew broccoli and break down the cells. Caution – myrosinase will be denatured when cooking. If this occurs, the conversion will take place via the body’s gut microflora, which is the same process if you are consuming glucoraphanin through a fortified food, beverage or supplement.

Try our latest broccoli recipe…on the grill this Labor Day!

Grilled Broccoli Salad with Radish Grilled Broccoli Salad Recipe Ingredients

Ingredients
1 head of broccoli
1 large red onion
2 ears corn
4 small radishes
1 tbsp. olive oil
Balsamic vinegar
salt
pepper

Directions
On a clean grill, coat grill rack with olive oil. Slice broccoli horizontally into medium thick slices. Cut red onion into thick slices. Grill corn in or out of the husk directly on grill or wrap it in aluminum foil and place on edge of grill.Grilled broccoli salad recipe ingredients on the grill

Brush vegetables lightly with olive oil on both sides to coat and season with salt and pepper. Place broccoli, onion and corn on heated grill and cook at medium to low temperature turning frequently to avoid burning. Cook for approximately 5-10 minutes and remove from heat. Mix vegetables together and drizzle lightly with balsamic.

Using a mandolin slice the radish over the salad and serve warm or chilled. Serves 4.

 

Ashley Koff, RD Shares Why Broccoli is Her Favorite Veggie with Dr. Oz

We caught up with award-winning nutrition expert Ashley Koff, RD, creator of the Better Nutrition Simplified Program to learn more about her recent appearance on the Dr. Oz Show and why broccoli is her favorite vegetable.

TrueBroc®: You recently professed your love for broccoli on the Dr. Oz Show. What is it about broccoli that you love so much?
Ashley Koff, RD: I was that “strange” kid who always loved eating broccoli. As a kid, I liked the taste and the brightly colored little trees. When I became a registered dietitian, I was excited to learn about all of the important vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that are packed into my favorite food!

TrueBroc®: What part of the broccoli has the most abundant supply of nutrients?
Ashley Koff, RD: Let’s be clear, all of broccoli is good for you. The leaves and the stem have different nutrients and amounts of nutrients than the florets. So I think rather than ask what part has the most abundant supply, I would highlight why I love the leaves (calcium), the stems (fiber) and the florets (lots of vitamins but also the super detox hero, glucoraphanin, that I told Dr. Oz about – that’s where you find the most of it, and broccoli florets have more glucoraphanin than any other food).

TrueBroc®: You mentioned during the show that broccoli is great for detoxing. Why is it such a good detox food?
Ashley Koff, RD: So first off, I think it is key for us to be reminded that we all have a detoxification system – the body’s equipped to identify and remove toxins. Thus, the foods that contain the nutrients that support that system – both phases of it – are a major part of our nutrition needs. For example, to convert harmful toxins and used hormones (which can become harmful if not eliminated) into less harmful ones, the body needs lots of vitamins and minerals like B vitamins, magnesium as well as plant nutrients like milk thistle and quercetin to support these efforts. Antioxidants found in colorful fruits and vegetables, as well as the plant nutrients in nuts, seeds, grains and beans that help do the “clean up” work.

Broccoli contains the highest amount of the phytonutrient glucoraphanin, which the body uses as a key detox agent – especially for the second part – to convert and eliminate those tough toxins and used hormones.

TrueBroc®: If people don’t eat broccoli, are there other ways to get the detox benefits of its glucoraphanin?
Ashley Koff, RD: Absolutely. You can blend broccoli into your morning shake or smoothie to help mask the sulfur/bitter taste (my friend Tess Masters, aka The Blender Girl, recommends frozen as it virtually eliminates the broccoli taste). Also, a friend and fellow registered dietitian, Amy Fischer (@thegreenfisch) developed this broccoli protein smoothie recipe. Enjoy!

Broccoli Protein Smoothie Recipe

Broccoli Protein Smoothie Recipe

Serving: 1

Ingredients

3 broccoli florets

1/2 pear

1/2 banana

2 tbsp. protein powder

1 cup almond milk

1/2 cup coconut water

1/4 tsp. vanilla bean powder

Directions

Add all ingredients to high-speed blender and enjoy. Optional: add ice.

Broccoli Protein Smoothie

Healthy Back-to-School Snacks – Bite-Sized Portions

Our friend at YES! Nutrition – registered dietitian Tori Holthaus – shares 4 after school snacks that offer nutrition in bite-sized portions. She incorporates Brassica Decaf Green Tea – which is fortified with TrueBroc® from broccoli – in her “mini decaf green tea lemonade ice bites,” so when your little scholar doesn’t want to eat his or her broccoli, you can rest assured they’re still getting the powerful antioxidant protection from TrueBroc® glucoraphanin.

A “Radbroc” Smoothie Recipe

Broccoli and RadishesWhat do you get when you combine broccoli florets with radishes? A detoxification power couple.

Broccoli contains the phytonutrient glucoraphanin and the enzyme myrosinase. When we chew raw broccoli, the myrosinase and glucoraphanin interact to create sulforaphane, which is a potent antioxidant and detoxifier.

In addition to being another rich source of myrosinase, radishes are mostly composed of water. Water helps to keep the body hydrated and helps to support the efficiency of digestion, ensuring proper uptake of nutrients from the food we eat – like broccoli.

Our nutrition consultant, Ashley Koff, RD, developed the following smoothie recipe, featuring the power couple “Radbroc.” Enjoy!

Radbroc Smoothie Recipe

Ingredients
3 radishes, washed*
3 broccoli leaves*
1 cup broccoli florets*
1 serving plant protein powder*
1 cup unsweetened hemp milk
1 cup frozen mango
2 tsp coconut oil
Optional: 1/2 ripe banana

Directions
Place all items in a blender and purée.

Makes 1 large (meal replacement) serving or 2 side servings.
*denotes organic